gendertremblr:

sometimes i just sit and think about the fact people honestly believe that women shaving their legs and wearing makeup are innate behaviors that we are naturally supposed to do and that we always were supposed to do. i just. think about that. and i laugh

July 31 2014, 05:55 PM   •   2,181 notes   •   Via   •   Source
#4 reals   
dirtyovercoats:

do nOT

dirtyovercoats:

do nOT

July 31 2014, 04:32 PM   •   342 notes   •   Via   •   Source

The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything.

 -

Scott Woods (X)

The quote I used in this post.

(via medievalpoc)

July 31 2014, 07:18 AM   •   86,223 notes   •   Via   •   Source
#so true   #racism   
racebending:

medievalpoc:

leeandlow submitted to medievalpoc:

The Diversity Gap in the highest grossing science fiction and fantasy films. Sad, right? You can see the full study here.

 I highly recommend reading the entire article. 
from the infographic:
Among the top 100 domestic grossing films:
only 8% of films star a protagonist of color
of the 8 protagonists of color, all are men; 6 are played by Will Smith and 1 is a cartoon character (Aladdin)
0% of protagonists are women of color
0% of protagonists are LGBTQ
1% of protagonists are people with a disability


Lee & Low interviewed me about racebending as part of understanding this infographic.

Very sad that Medievalpoc got so much backlash simply for sharing this image.

racebending:

medievalpoc:

leeandlow submitted to medievalpoc:

The Diversity Gap in the highest grossing science fiction and fantasy films. Sad, right? You can see the full study here.

I highly recommend reading the entire article.

from the infographic:

Among the top 100 domestic grossing films:

  • only 8% of films star a protagonist of color
  • of the 8 protagonists of color, all are men; 6 are played by Will Smith and 1 is a cartoon character (Aladdin)
  • 0% of protagonists are women of color
  • 0% of protagonists are LGBTQ
  • 1% of protagonists are people with a disability

Lee & Low interviewed me about racebending as part of understanding this infographic.

Very sad that Medievalpoc got so much backlash simply for sharing this image.

July 31 2014, 07:11 AM   •   5,428 notes   •   Via   •   Source

siawrites:

pardalia:

thewomanfromitaly:

the-goddamazon:

bittersiha:

NASA SAYS THERE IS A STRANGE AND UNKNOWN SIGNAL COMING FROM THE PERSEUS CLUSTER RIGHT NOW

PERSEUS CLUSTER

PERSEUS VEIL

ITS THE GETH

The entire Mass Effect fandom is losing their shit.

BRB SCIENCE

image

Just in case you wanted the full explanation.  NASA’s Chandra observatory.

July 31 2014, 07:05 AM   •   9,748 notes   •   Via   •   Source
July 31 2014, 07:04 AM   •   6,878 notes   •   Via   •   Source

We came back to Gaza one year ago because my mother was extremely ill (totally blind because of diabetes), and with the Rafah border consistently closed it’s impossible to get someone in her condition to Cairo, let alone to Germany.

Since our return, my children are constantly asking questions. Why don’t kids in Gaza have playgrounds? Why do children play in crowded streets? Why don’t their peers have enough food? It breaks my heart to answer these questions, but at least I know how.

Since the war [latest Israeli assault] started, though, I’m stumped more and more often — and the questions are multiplying. What is happening, Mom? Why are they killing children? (Three of their young second young cousins — Ibrahim, Eman, and Asem — died, along with a pregnant woman and four other children, when Israel fired missiles at their multi-family apartment building. No military target was identified.) Will we die, too? Why do they hate us? Don’t they have children?

Am I supposed to tell them that, yes, we could die at any time from an incoming shell? Surely, I shouldn’t tell them about 19 children of the Abu Jamei family who were killed when a missile fired at one person struck them all as they broke the Ramadan fast one recent evening. How can I explain that, yes, the soldiers who have killed so many children often have children of their own? How can I persuade them that fireworks in Germany signify joy and celebration, while “fireworks” in Gaza cause death?

The most painful question they’ve asked me is a response to our neurotic nighttime habits. One night, I make all three sleep in the same bedroom with us, hoping to increase the odds they’ll survive if a shell hits one of the empty rooms in our house. But then the next night, I’ll separate them, thinking that if I divide my children they won’t all die in an attack. (Unless we’re hit by a half-ton bomb, rather than artillery shell, in which case we’ll all be killed, anyway.)

These are the painful contortions I’d wish on no mother anywhere. Yet mothers throughout Gaza make these decisions every night — and live with the consequences of one ill-fated move. But how am I supposed to answer when Maryam asks, “Why do we sleep somewhere different each night?”

My children, as with all children in Gaza, will need therapy following this carnage. Most, of course, will not receive it. They will enter adulthood remembering these days and the soldiers, F-16s and drones that were heedless of their nighttime cries and terror. Their mothers and fathers — unable to guard their children from these horrors — will need psychological help. And grandparents may have it worse of all, since the midnight terror this month feels terribly like the nights nearly seven decades ago when they were expelled from their homes in what became Israel, never to return.

 -

Wejdan Abu Shammala, “The awful decisions I’ve made to protect my Palestinian children

The Washington Post op-ed. July 30th, 2014.

July 31 2014, 07:04 AM   •   720 notes   •   Via   •   Source
#gaza   
July 31 2014, 06:42 AM   •   9,513 notes   •   Via   •   Source
#haaaa   
July 31 2014, 06:22 AM   •   656,361 notes   •   Via   •   Source

I’m an adult, but not like a real adult

 - anyone between the ages of 18 and 25 (via prettyboystyles)
July 31 2014, 01:53 AM   •   147,016 notes   •   Via   •   Source
#tru